Sustainable Reading Nr.7

Fashion

Interview: Veja On Its New Biodegradable Sneakers Made From Corn Waste – It is great that there are a lot of alternatives popping up in fashion and footwear, however, the headline is a bit misleading as they say quite clearly that only part of the shoe is biodegradable currently, parts of it are not.

These Female Entrepreneurs Are Making The Fashion Industry More Sustainable – Introducing 5 amazing women and what they do to support and drive sustainable fashion.

EU Backs ‘Traceability Tool’ For Apparel Brands – It’s great to hear that EU is taking the problem seriously, although I hope this tool will also be used to support consumer decision and will truly be traceable.

Pilot Shows Female Bosses In Garment Factories Boost Efficiency – Actually, they say that, female supervisors do. It is great to hear that gender equality is taken more seriously in Bangladesh and these numbers can support more female supervisors in the factories and possibly even higher positions. However, I am afraid whether this can also lead to pushing the female supervisors to be harsher on the employees with their new position where they have to prove themselves.

MUD Commits To 100% Recycled Cotton Jeans – They are said to be the most sustainable denim brand at the moment and it is great to hear that they are pushing the sustainability forward!

Levi’s Launches ‘Cottonised Hemp’ Collection – Hemp is a more sustainable fibre than cotton, however, in the article, it is not made clear how hemp is cottonised and whether the process is done with chemicals, whether it is designed in a circular way nor any other facts on it. And the collection is just made with sustainability in mind and is not completely cottonised hemp. Still, I am happy to see that the company is paying more and more attention to sustainability.

Sustainable New of the Month - January 2018 - byLiiL

 

Climate Change

Swedish Student Leader Wins EU Pledge To Spend Billions On Climate – She isn’t the only one who protested as there were protests all over the world where children skipped school to protest for the politicians to do important decisions about the environment. In the end, teachers joined them! EU has now pledged to put a big investment into our environment from 2021 to 2027. I hope it’s not too late.

Britain Is On Its Way To Be Powered By Renewables More Than Fossil Fuels For First Time In History – The government has just signed a deal to support offshore wind sectors and is planning for 70% of the electricity to come from wind.

 

Social

The Internet Is Censoring Our Ability To Make Informed Decisions – This is a very interesting read. You might not agree with everything, but there is a deeper meaning to it.

The Racism Of Technology – And Why Driverless Cars Could Be The Most Dangerous Example Yet – Very interesting yet alarming article into the racism in the technology sector and whether it is safe.

South African Judge Rules Same-Sex Discrimination In The Church Is Unlawful – More diversity!

Mali Is Providing Free Health Care To Pregnant Women and Children Under 5 – In addition, they are providing contraception free of charge. When health care is often expensive even in the western countries it is great to hear how Mali is supporting it’s vulnerable!

NASA Just Announced It’s First-Ever All-Female Spacewalk – It’s about time they are thinking about gender equality in that sector too!

Happy Favourites of the Week - Russian Literature and Work - byLiiL

Waste

Sir David Attenborough Backs Decision To Double UK Aid For Plastic Recycling – It didn’t really explain what it means by UK aid for plastic recycling, nevertheless, it is great to hear that recycling plastic is taken seriously. Recycling is not the answer to climate change or waste problem, but it should be considered as part of the solution at least at this moment.

This UK Charity Uses Recycling To Create Healthier, Greener Lives In Kenya – WasteAid is educating citizen in developing countries on how to collect and recycle their waste.

The #Trashtag Challenge Is Getting People To Clean Up Their Local Environments – I’m sure many have heard about beach cleanups from all over the world. Trashtag is not only for the beaches but for any environment and it’s a great movement, but it does make me sad that there is a need for such movement. Throwing trash is forests, parks or any other area is not nice nor environmental. Beaches get a lot of trash from the ocean and my next question would be, where does the trash that was collected under trashtag go? Does it go back to landfills?

 

Business

Are B Corp An Elite Charade For Changing The World – An interesting discussion into what can change the world and whether market leading it is the answer.

Ikea To Launch Furniture Rental Offering As Part Of Circular Economy Shift – It is great a company this big is thinking about their footprint and how they can reduce waste, as well as repair the items they make.

 

 

What interesting news did you read recently? Share them in the comment box below!

With love,

Lii

 

Other articles you might be interested in:

Sustainable reading No. 6

Sustainable reading No. 4

Sustainable reading No. 2

 

You can also find me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

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My Sustainable Journey In February

My plan for February was to find a toothpaste that creates less waste and is still good for my health. Originally I wanted to change my toothpaste after I’ve read several posts about fluoride and how it can have a bad effect on our health. There are a few fluoride free toothpaste options but most of them are in plastic tubes, which does not help when I want to create less waste. So far I’ve quite like toothpaste from Ecodenta, especially their charcoal one, as that is fluoride free (not all natural toothpaste will be fluoride free). I did try some from Georganics, but found the glass jar not as convenient especially when I was really tired. (I might try some of their other products though in the future). At the beginning of February I ordered some fluoride-free toothpaste tablets from Society zero, which I wanted to try, but then I had to get my tooth fixed and fluoride toothpaste was the only thing that was working for me for a couple of weeks. So I’ve only been trying the toothpaste tablet for a week or so, but so far I quite like them. I think I’ll have to try them for longer to be sure and possibly try some toothy tabs from Lush and other Georganics products to find the product that I am the happiest with health wise and waste wise.

If you want to read more about fluoride and decide for yourself if you want to have toothpaste with it you can check the following articles F Toxins, Curiosly Conscious, Georganics. There most certainly are many more articles and most of them will explain two different sides of pro or con fluoride. The one thing that I found out is that fluoride in small amounts is great for your enamel but otherwise not too good for human health, and the fluoride used in toothpaste is often industrial based by-product, which circularity in mind is great, but I am not sure if we should be using that in our bodies.

My Sustainable Journey In February - byLiiL

No Logo

In February I also finished the book No Logo by Naomi Klein. The book is not an actual sustainability book, but I found that helps with understanding the world, how it works and what drives it – all things that affect how we can change it to a more sustainable one. It talks about how brands are everywhere, even where we don’t think they are, how much influence they have on people, their decision making and what they trust or don’t trust. It also uncovers the secrets these brands have and would rather not let their customers know about them. What strikes me is not how influential the brands are on customers but even on governments and their decision making.

It also discusses in extent how brands, although try to market diversity, in real life hope for and try to achieve less diversity because their products will be easier to market to a bigger group.

The book is quite old, written in 1999, and I believe many of the companies mentioned have changed their ways. Nevertheless, it shows what brands have been doing, what they might be doing, and how they try to achieve the maximum profit by investing their money in things that they think matters.

My Sustainable Journey In February - byLiiL

March

There is one thing I am constantly getting annoyed about and that is junk mail that we get in the mail. Nevertheless, of trying to sign off from any mailing lists many surrounding companies just want to bombard us with adverts about their menus, new stores or community groups. And although, I know sometimes there is good behind what they are advertising I am the one who has to dispose of all that mail. In Finland, we could just write that we do not accept junk mail and we could be free of this mail, in the UK it doesn’t quite work that way. So I am going to look into the junk mail problem in March. Wish me luck!

 

What sustainable did you do in February? And what are your plans for March?

With love,

Lii

 

You can also find me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Other articles you might be interested in:

My Sustainable Journey In January

My Sustainable 2018

Sustainability in 2017

My Sustainable Journey In February - byLiiL

Biodegradable vs Photodegradable vs Compostable

This post is a long time coming. With many different companies talking about a greener packaging they have I have gotten confused about what actually is environmentally friendly packaging. Then after visiting the plastic recycling centre in Scotland and hearing all about plastic recycling and whether biodegradable plastic fits into plastic recycling, I found out some new information. Once when looking at a seemingly green website I checked their packaging which they claimed to be great for the environment as it is photodegradable. Was it greenwashing or was it just ignorance, I don’t know, so I decided to find out properly what these packaging words mean that are floating around. I certainly don’t know everything, but I did research into multiple sources to find the most reliable information. I hope it will help some of you understand these words as well. And I am talking about the packaging connecting to food more than anything else, but it does correlate to other industries as well.

Biodegradable vs Photodegradable vs Compostable - byLiiL

Photodegradable

Photodegradable means that it will decompose with sunlight, meaning it will break into smaller pieces when subjected to light. The big problem with photodegradable packaging is that it sounds like it would be a good option for the environment, however, nearly everything in the world will decompose, the question is how quickly will it decompose and whether it will leave any harmful substances when it does. Some products may take thousands of years to decompose and in many cases when they decompose they release harmful chemicals into the environment and the waterways. The fact that something is photodegradable doesn’t tell much about the product, other than it requires sunlight to do so.

Biodegradable vs Photodegradable vs Compostable - byLiiL

Biodegradable

Biodegradable means that the decomposing happens when the items are subject to living organisms such as fungi or bacteria. In general, biodegradable is a term associated with green packaging, and it’s been considered as a great alternative because what comes from nature goes back. However, biodegradable doesn’t always mean it comes from nature.

There are several terms that all can be confused with each other, but don’t actually mean the same thing; biodegradable plastic, bioplastic and biodegradable materials such as paper. Biodegradable plastic is essentially plastic that is designed to decompose quickly by adding additives to them, and bioplastic is plastic made out of natural materials such as corn starch. Both of these are essentially plastics as they are made out of polymers, but each of these materials behaves differently when decomposing, it takes them varied times to decompose and they require different environments for decomposing often high temperatures and possibly even UV lights. Biodegradable does not mean we can throw the items with an easy conscience into the bin, as the landfill is not an optimum environment for them to decompose and instead the decomposing could release methane gas. Nor can we throw them in the compost without knowing what they are actually made out of or whether they are suitable for home or industrial composting (more on that in composting section).

 

Biodegradable Plastic

The big problem with biodegradable is that it is often misconceived as a natural material that is better for the environment, but this is a generalisation. Lately biodegradable plastic has been in the news for all the soda bottles which were contributing to the oceans microplastic problem because the plastic degraded quickly but only into small pieces instead of disappearing completely. If packaging is market as biodegradable it really requires further information on in what conditions is it biodegradable and whether it leaves harmful residues when it is biodegraded. In a sense, biodegradable is a buzz word as it doesn’t inform consumers of what they need to do with the packaging. It could require industrial composting and often it cannot be recycled with other plastics as it rather contaminates them. Biodegradable products are not regulated.

 

Bioplastic

Bioplastics, on the other hand, are derived from renewable sources such as corn starch, sugarcane, bacteria etc. Bioplastic can be made into PLA which is compostable in the right environment or PET which is not compostable, so whether bioplastic is compostable is dependant on what kind of plastic is created with it. This also brings the question of how to dispose of it, as PLA could potentially be put into a compost bin but it would contaminate the plastic recycling making it unrecyclable and PET would contaminate the compost but could possibly be recycled with conventional PET plastic.

As bioplastic sounds like an excellent alternative there are some serious environmental consequences. To make bioplastic a lot of crops is grown which requires intensive agriculture, which is not modified in the same way as food agriculture is and it can lead to soil erosion and fertilizer runoff. On top of the machinery that is used in agriculture, possible deforestation and space it takes from food agriculture. Bioplastic made out of bacteria although was the first known bioplastic invented in 1926, is still rarely used.

Biodegradable vs Photodegradable vs Compostable - byLiiL

Compostable

Compostable means naturally derived products that can be put amongst decaying natural substances to decompose by microorganisms eventually turning into nutrient-rich substance. There are two types of compostable products; they can either be composted in a home compost or they need to a special environment that only industrial composting can create.

Composting is a fairly efficient way to process natural waste with great benefits. Compost is a great natural fertiliser that reduces soil erosion, controls ground moisture and weeds and restores soil fertility.

Problems with compost result when the compost is contaminated with synthetic substances or with materials that have toxic dyes for example, or if the home compost is contaminated with other compostable material that requires industrial composting. Food ingredients are quite simple to understand that they are compostable, but the packaging is not quite so simple. There are more rules regarding marking on the packaging about compostability because the packaging needs to be tested according to the compost standards whether it is compostable. That is why, in the UK, most home composts are said to only accept food compost, as any kind of packaging could make people confused about what can be composted and it could easily be contaminated. One issue I have with the UK compost is that they do not even seem to take tissues, but they do take teabags which have plastic in them. So if you are reading this, stop putting tea bags into your compost unless you are 100% sure it doesn’t have plastic in it.

When it comes to food packaging compostable is one of the most sensible options, as food contaminated the plastic and the paper, which makes them unrecyclable. When the packaging is compostable and it has food scraps in it, it all just goes into the same bin. Compostable packaging is regulated and therefore if you see their standards on the packaging you know what you are buying into and how to dispose of the packaging. However, if compostable items are sent to the landfill they produce biogas and methane which are not great for the environment.

These are some of the labels that you can find on packaging which is compostable, but there might be others which should be clearly marked on the packaging.

At the moment I am excited about Vegware which is a Scottish company supplying certified compostable packaging worldwide, Alterwaste for coming up with compostable new solutions to food waste and Percol for having their coffee packet in compostable coffee bags. What companies are you excited about?

With love,

Lii

Packaging photos are from Oleg Magni from Pexels.

Other articles you might be interested in:

Doing Small Changes Won’t Save the Planet – But It’s a Start

Is Recycling Sustainable

World Recycling Week

You can also find me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Sustainable Reading Nr. 6

Fashion

MPs Say Fast Fashion Brands Inaction On Ethics Is Shocking – Again, many NGOs activists have been saying this for years and for the MPs to now contribute to the discussion feels slow, nevertheless, they are discussing it. The article points out what the government’s committee on the topic found out from some of the major UK high street brands about their sustainable and ethical initiatives, and it ranks these high street brands on the basis of their answers. The problem is that although they are ranked into three groups there isn’t much information on what they are really doing about sustainability and ethics and whether this is supported by evidence. To that, there were many companies that were missing from the list such as Zara, H&M, Victorias Secret and many others.

Polartec Commits To 100% Recycled Materials – The header is actually a bit wrong as it explains how Polartec commits to 100% recycled and biodegradable materials. It is still amazing to read about!

Sustainable Reading Nr. 6 - byLiiL

Social

Is Sunscreen The New Margarine? – An excellent article that makes you think. Is the dermatological industry just trying to get their money’s worth and are you getting enough vitamin D?

This Teen Wrote A Bill To End Period Poverty In School – How amazing is that! When the adults are not working on things that they should be working on, there is hope that in the future these young people will grow and make the world a better place!

This Pakistani Province Just Made Polio Vaccines Mandatory For All Schoolchildren – This is a big step to eradicate the disease from the country and I hope it will go well. Although I am interested to see whether the government will support this financially.

The Future Of Gender Equality Lies In The Hands Of Female Coders: UN Chief – It is great that they are recognising that by having more women knowledgeable in the skills needed for the future and I hope there will be more support to the girls as well!

Sustainable Reading Nr. 6 - byLiiL

Plastic

A Better Way To Make Plastic Out Of Sulfur – Alternative source from which to make plastic.

Cork Vs. Cap: Which Wine Stopper Is Better? – Going through different corks and caps and what are their benefits, as well as which ones are good ecologically.

This Water Bottle Dissolves If It Ever Enters the Ocean – They talk about a biodegradable water bottle that is made out of “biopolymer called PHA that’s comes from a fermenting bacteria”. It is supposed to decompose when it touch with naturally occurring bacteria. That is how biodegradability works, however, in the article there was no proof how quickly this happens or whether it leaves any harmful chemicals behind. I will be in a post soon explaining the differences and characteristic of biodegradability and other such words relating to packaging so stay tuned.

Researchers Just Found A Brilliant Way To Convert Plastic Waste Into Fuel – The heat it up so high it is supposed to turn back into oil. If it actually works then brilliant, but it does make me wonder how it took them this long to come up with such an idea.

Sustainable Reading Nr. 6 - byLiiL

Other News

French and German Farmers Forced To Destroy Crops After GMOs Found In Bayer/Monsanto Seeds – The headline itself raises few thoughts. Mostly, GREAT they are actually doing something about the GMO seeds, the second, I feel sorry for the farmers. In the article Bayer/Monsanto say they will be reimbursing the farmers for the lost revenue, however, it is still not clear how the illegal seeds got into the crop. I really hope countries would start supporting more organic farming and especially non-Bayer-Monsanto seeds.

How Danone, Kashi and O’Lakes Are Backing Sustainable Farming – Article talks about what are the issues for farmers to transfer to sustainable farming and how the big companies are looking for more sustainable production. It brings out one problem, which is the price for the farmers to transfer to sustainable farming and how it can be a big barrier, where although the payout is going to be better in the long term, in short term can be too costly for the farmers to do. Seeing this, shouldn’t the big companies and governments support them through this transition?

The Soon-To-Be Worlds Biggest Offshore Wind Farm Will Start Powering Britain This Week – How great! I hope the whole country will soon be completely powered by clean energy!

Sea Turtle Populations Soared by 980% After Legal Protections – It is great to hear that the protections are working and animals are rebounding. Although the number is from a median, and might not tell the whole truth to a person who doesn’t know enough about the topic.

Sustainable Reading Nr. 6 - byLiiL

All pictures are from Pexels.

What news did you find were interesting lately? Share the links in the comment section below.

With love,

Lii

 

Check out the other sustainable reading posts: Nr. 5, Nr. 4, Nr.3.

You can also find me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

My Sustainable Journey in January

This is a new thread which I hope will help me to become even more sustainable and hopefully inspire some of you to do changes with me. I started January fairly easily by calculating my carbon footprint.

My Sustainable Journey in January - byLiiL

Calculating My Carbon Footprint

My carbon footprint – 4.56 metric tons of CO2e. I did this calculation based on my habits in 2018. Although the numbers don’t actually make a lot of sense to me what does is a comparison; The average carbon footprint in the UK is 6.5 metric tons, so I know I am below that. I also know the world target it 2 metric tons which is way below of my usage. The number of flights I took in 2018 amounted to 1.41 metric tons, which is quite a lot, but I offset this by not having a car and using mainly public transport to get around. Also, I don’t fly quite so much every year, but living away from your family in a place from where it is hard to get to them by any other means than flying does make this number higher than it would otherwise.

Now that I know what my footprint is I can work on lowering it. The problem is that the majority of my footprint comes from gas and electricity in my household which amounts to 1.28 metric tons for just me and that I cannot change in a rental flat. Although I know that part of the energy I get is from wind power I don’t know how big amount it is and therefore it cannot be calculated into this. In the future when I move I hope to change this! What comes to shopping I don’t shop much, mostly just what I need, food and occasionally some extra items. However, I do know that I could live more eco-friendly.

What I did notice about this calculated it didn’t take into account your recycling and other waste habits, nor where or what type of produce you shopped for. It does suggest that to lower your carbon footprint you should not buy fruits and vegetables that are not in season, however, in the calculation, it doesn’t take this into account which could either lower or grow that CO2 emission.  It also doesn’t take into account packaging in any products, water usage nor whether you have pets in the house. All of these are minor things, but they do add up. Nevertheless, it provides with a suggested number of what your footprint is. If you want to calculate your carbon footprint you can try THIS calculator which is free to use!

My Sustainable Journey in January - byLiiL

Zero Waste Tries

I tried few zero waste products in January; bamboo toothbrush, zero waste deodorant and zero waste dry shampoo. The bamboo toothbrush was okay. I didn’t mind the bamboo handle, which I’ve heard complaints about. However, it doesn’t work as well as my electric toothbrush at keeping my teeth clean, and the bristles could be designed to get into every crevice. If the bristles could be designed better I think it would be a great alternative to regular plastic toothbrushed, but I hope the industry will start designing eco-friendly electric toothbrushes as they are superior to your own health! I quite liked my zero waste deodorant by Kutis, I didn’t feel any smell on the days when I used it, nor any sensitivity. But like with many natural deodorants I started feeling itchy after few days of use. Nevertheless, it is a great deodorant for not so sensitive armpits. The zero waste dry shampoo by Kitenest I love! It takes time to get used to using it, but it is awesome and you get a lot in this package!

My Sustainable Journey in January - byLiiL

 

In February I am planning to finally find myself some natural and zerowaste toothpaste. If you have any recommendations please let me know in the comment box below!

All pictures are from pexels, first and last by Min An.

My Sustainable Journey in January - byLiiL

What sustainable have you done in January?

With love,

Lii

 

You can also find me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Sustainable Reading Nr. 5

Fashion

What Does A Sustainable Closet Look Like? – The World Threads Traveler introduces her walking wardrobe and what is her wardrobe made of, whilst reiterating how sustainable closet doesn’t need to be made 100% of ethically and sustainably made garments. Interesting read that will calm your anxiety over the fast fashion items that you bought when you didn’t know what you were doing.

Green Finance Boost For Myanmar Garment Sector – Myanmar garment factories are looking to cut their CO2 emissions!

PFCs Not Necessary In Outdoor Clothing, Claims Study – Non-fluorinated polymers work as well as fluorinated polymers to repel water.

UK Garment Factories Flouting Minimum Wage Laws – Finally the officials are looking into this and the factories are forced to pay back what the employees were meant to be paid originally! It is still a big problem, which needs to be addressed, but that is a start!

Levi’s To Pilot Blockchain Use In Supply Chain – I’ve heard good things about what Levi is trying to achieve in the fashion industry and am happy to continue hearing how they want to transform the whole industry to be better.

Sustainable Reading Nr. 5 - byLiiL

Plastic & Waste

Microplastics Ban Could Cause Beauty Sector Billions – Although microplastic beads are already restricted in the EU and especially in the UK some sort of microplastics still exist in the beauty, detergent and agricultural fertilisers and the industry is fighting back on their ban as there is no quick solution to replace this formula. Yes, it might cause the industry a lot of money, but it can cause the environment even more. And quite frankly I don’t want any kind of plastic in my beauty products, detergents or fertilisers!

Fashionista’s New Survey Suggests That Bullying Is Still Alive And Well In The Fashion Industry – It is an unfortunate truth that is probably live in many industries, however, the fashion industry is very clicky, a trend-driven place where everybody is trying to show what they are made of. The constant competition to get ahead and to get paid properly for your work doesn’t help the situation. I have experienced the clicky atmosphere, the senior staff that behaved like they were the royalty who you should not talk to and the employers who didn’t think you are worthy of being paid to. Unfortunately, in the fashion industry everybody knows somebody and complaining about this is difficult because you might not be employed again.

This New Recycling Facility Will Repurpose 90% Of Household Waste – In Australia, this recycling facility is attempting to recycle the neighbouring household’s waste. It is not the first of it’s kind. In northern European countries this is a fairly common practice that should be employed in other countries as well. The technology is there it is just missing the infrastructure to put in place everywhere else.

World’s First Plastic Free Flight Paving The Way For Green Aviation – Hurray! Although how has this been not a thing for ages I don’t know. I hope other companies are quick to follow suit!

Sustainable Reading Nr. 5 - byLiiL

Social

The Disturbing Racial Bias Of The Greatest Dancer  – It is interesting how by giving all the power to the public we can see how racially biased it is.

‘Breast Ironing’ Is Happening In The UK , Affecting Up To 1,000 Girls – The saddest thing about this is that the mothers feel like they need to protect their girls, or do they feel they want to control them in this way? Nevertheless, the health problems resulting from such behaviour is why this should be made illegal, but also it is something that should be talked more widely why it can be harmful to girls.

The UAE’s Gender Equality Awards Were Missing One Important Thing: Women – As ridiculous as it sounds the UAE had their awards for gender equality where all the recipients of initiating or encouraging gender equality were men. Nevertheless, of the country being on the forefront of gender equality in the Gulf State area, it seems as though they found a new award to award men of seemingly doing something. It is great that they are working on it, but it just shows they still have a long way to go!

The Ethical Issues With Amazon – A very comprehensive article by Francesca from Ethical Unicorn explaining the big problems with Amazon. We all knew there were problems, but this is quite unbelievable!

Sustainable Reading Nr. 5 - byLiiL

What interesting sustainability news have you read about recently?

With love,

Lii

Recycled Wool Blanket from Future Kept

Recycled Wool Blanket

My home is usually cold in the winter months, nevertheless of heating. I live on the top floor on top of a hill with poor insulation in windows where I can hear the wind whistling on almost any day, as the wind is a fairly common occurrence in Scotland. This usually means that I am always dressed in layers of warm clothing and am snuggled under a blanket. The blanket I have is knitted and crocheted patchwork blanket that I’ve made out of leftover yarn. I love it, but it isn’t the prettiest thing to keep when we get guests, and it has holes which do not always make it the warmest. Also, sometimes you just need more than one blanket.

Recycled Wool Blanket from Future Kept - byLiiL

I remembered seeing recycled wool blankets somewhere and decided to search online if I could find any. Almost instantly I found this shop Future Kept which sells a variety of beautiful recycled wool blankets in different check prints. Before I knew it I had ordered myself one, and in a couple of days, I was admiring the beautiful and so cosy recycled wool blanket made by Tweedmill. Since then it has been warming me every day alongside my other blanket. It is the warmest thing I have and it keeps the heat in very well. So well that the cats can’t stay under it for long periods of time as they get too warm. I fell in love with the blanket instantly and since then have been planning on purchasing one in another colour to have in my bedroom when I need extra layers in there.

Recycled Wool Blanket from Future Kept - byLiiL

Ethical Wool

The blanket is great quality, it looks beautiful and I love that it is made out of recycled wool in Wales. Wool is such an amazing fibre which is adaptable to heat and cold keeping you warm in cold and keeping you cool when it’s warm. In addition, it is antibacterial, breathable, natural, biodegradable, strong and it is easy to care for. There are problems with the ethics of wool, which you can read about in this excellent post. Unfortunately, ethically produced wool can be difficult, but not impossible, to find and I love to see the wool being recycled as it makes it more sustainable and shows just how resilient the fibre is.

Future Kept

Before I purchased the blanket I checked the Future Kept website and was so happy to have found another ethical store that is concentrated on timeless pieces, that are hand made, are of great quality and unique. The owners Jeska and Dean Herne themselves say that they created the online shop to “to seek out beautiful and useful items for life and the home that are made with love, thoughtfulness and detail”, which definitely translates through the pages. They offer beautiful home wear, down to earth accessories, delicate jewellery, natural beauty, beautiful books and journals, and much more. The website is a joy to visit and discover new beautiful items. I also love that from every sale 1% goes for the Planet, where they give 1% of any sale directly to environmental, not for profit groups that focus on protecting, preserving and restoring our planet. I love that!

The whole website looks beautiful and it’s like diving into Jeska’s and Dean’s world when visiting it. Their photography is lovely and rustic where each picture could be on Instagram. Their Instagram feed looks just like the shop come to life with a strong hygge (a word that I really don’t like, but it is the only word I can think of describing it) feeling to it. I know that I will be checking their shop especially when it comes to buying presents either for loved ones or to treat myself!

Recycled Wool Blanket from Future Kept - byLiiL

Have you shopped at Future Kept? What kind of a blanket would you prefer; virgin wool, recycled wool, made out of recycled plastic bags, any other?

With love,

Lii